John Miller

John Miller, Professor of Professional Practice in the Department of Art History at Barnard College, is an artist and critic whose work has been exhibited internationally. He was Mike Kelley's friend and colleague from 1978 until Kelley's death in 2012.

  • Mike Kelley

    Mike Kelley

    Educational Complex

    John Miller

    An illustrated examination of a 1995 work by Mike Kelley that marked a significant change in his work.

    One of the most influential artists of our time, Mike Kelley (1954–2012) produced a body of innovative work mining American popular culture as well as modernist and postmodernist art—relentless examinations of subjectivity and of society that are both sinister and ecstatic. With a wide range of media, Kelley's work explores themes as varied as post-punk politics, religious systems, social class, and repressed memory. Using architectural models to represent schools he attended, his 1995 work, Educational Complex, presents forgotten spaces as frames for private trauma, real or imagined. The work's implications are at once miniature and massive. In this book, John Miller offers an illustrated examination of this milestone work that marked a significant change in Kelley's practice.

    A “complex” can mean an architectural configuration, a psychological syndrome, or a political apparatus, and Miller approaches Educational Complex through corresponding lines of inquiry, considering the making of the work, examining it in terms of education and trauma (sexual or otherwise), and investigating how it tests the ideological horizon of art as an institution. Miller shows that in Educational Complex, Kelley expands his political and aesthetic focus, including not only such artifacts as generic forms of architecture but (inspired by the infamous McMartin Preschool case) popular fantasies associated with ritual sex abuse and false memory syndrome. Through this archaeology of the contemporary, Miller argues, Kelley examines the mandate for education and the liberal democratic premises underpinning it.

    • Hardcover $35.00
    • Paperback $19.95

Contributor

  • Relative Intimacies, Volume 3

    Relative Intimacies, Volume 3

    Intersubjectivity

    Lou Cantor and Emily Watlington

    An examination of the introduction of a non-human actor into the field of intersubjectivity.

    Our most intimate spaces are increasingly sites of intersubjective relations. The widespread presence of technological networks in particular has made visible the ways in which agency and subjectivity are often distributed, engendering theories of hybrid subjects who might integrate the human with other biological or technological agents. These incursions into traditional notions of subjectivity not only destabilize our sense of autonomy but also explode the human sensorium, reminding us that it is only one of many viable systems for sensing, perceiving, and communicating.

    Relative Intimacies collects essays, conversations, and artworks to explore how technology now mediates our encounters and, in doing so, forms alternate, networked subjectivities. It asks how intersubjective intimacy might be theorized epistemologically, aesthetically, philosophically, and politically, and considers how such relative intimacy might connect physical matter and cybernetic systems or forge new subjectivities between constellations of actors. Bringing together academic, curatorial, and artistic perspectives, Relative Intimacies initiates points of contact between artificial, biological, and emotional intelligence.

    ContributorsCecilia Bengolea, Dora Budor, Lou Cantor, Constant Dullaart, Hal Foster, Kevin Gotkin, Camille Henrot, Sun-Ha Hong, Tobias Kaspar, Devin Kenny, Agnieszka Kurant, Lynn Hershman Leeson, John Miller, Frederick Cruz Nowell, X Zhu-Nowell, Samantha Ozer, Aleksandra Przegalinska, Farid Rakun, Tiana Reid, Patrick Urs Riechert, Isabel de Sena, Jenna Sutela, Elena Vogman, Emily Watlington

    • Paperback $22.00